Vote for Fair Copyright and Culture

I’ve been brewing up a post that I’d hoped to release today, reflecting on the experience of indie music promotion and how it’s changed in a very short time (2-3 years), but I’m putting that on hold, as there are more important matters to address. Specifically, the fate of creators and the creative industries in Canada.

In case you didn’t already know, we’ve got an incumbent minority government that unilaterally, and without Parliamentary debate, slashed approximately $45 million in funding to the Arts this summer. In addition, this same government has been repeatedly trying to introduce U.S.-style copyright reform legislation that, much like our PM’s speeches, appear to be plagiarized from foreign documents. The framing given for this proposed legislation is that it is intended to protect creators’ rights. Clearly, given the recent funding cuts, not to mention the characterization of artists as “spoiled children“, this claim is hypocritical. Some argue it’s de facto censorship.

Among the myriad reasons to not vote for the Conservative Party of Canada (hey, Net Neutrality!), their inconsistent positions on the value of artists, musicians, authors, and other creatives should convince anyone still disposed to vote for them to change their minds. Either the Conservatives have not thought these policies through (the charitable view), or they have thought this contradiction through and are happy with it – seizing upon any opportunities to reinforce copyright protections for the IP of big business and abandon public funding for creatives.

Michael Geist has posted a Copyright Pledge, which many candidates have signed already, with many more coming on board as I write this. If you care about fair copyright, and if you don’t want to see U.S.-style infringements on Canadians’ privacy, or their rights to fair dealing, then find a candidate you can vote for in this list, or vote-swap if you have to to ensure the Conservative party of Canada does not form even a minority government this time around. Fair copyright policies enable us all to quote, copy, reuse, mix and match, you know, the basic stuff that beings that have and make culture do (there are no arts without copying or mimicry). To vote against fair copyright drives a stake in the heart of participatory culture and media. The foundations of this very Internet medium, and our rights to participate in culture at all are right now at stake.

And now – the punchline. If you haven’t already seen this, or if you’re unfamiliar with the terrain of arts funding in a bilingual, multicultural Canada, this video says it all: