Sharkbook and Twitnets

I’m going to call it now – Facebook has officially jumped the shark.

This comes with apologies to those who thought FB died hours ago, when it made another attack-user-privacy-or-otherwise-degrade-user-happiness move. And gosh darnit, if this isn’t the type of action the FB population was just starting to get used to.

This comes without apologies to those of you who thought FB started to suck the moment the CIA conspiracy theory started circulating. You folks fell on your own sword there, as that rumour has long been debunked (FYI, awesome post, Brainsturbator – who knew Tetris was a CIA plot, too?), even though many news agencies and websites still repeat it, some as recently as this month.

With all of you mentioned above, I disagree and call FB’s failure now. In its move to beat twitter at its own game – by reorganizing its formerly compartmentalized and configurable information structure into the simple, much-maligned “What’s on your mind?” deluge – and best of all, forcing all users to adopt it – FB has copied its best competitor (twitter) in the worst possible way, and ceased being innovative. So they’re basically the new Myspace (when it sold out to News Corp), the new Friendster (when it started banning fakesters) – or, perhaps, depending on where you were in 2000 – the new makeoutclub.

Twitter might survive as a different animal altogether (of the let’s take the “site” out of “social networking site” variety), should it remain an “extensible” “application”. Or put another way, if the high tech venture capital economy really does tank, the twitterverse could still survive in the same manner as Usenet did – free, open, but with perhaps less reach than any present-day social network service. And perhaps the new twitterverse would also be as fragmented and shadowy as that channel-centred realm was.

Then again, perhaps the lure of venture capital is too compelling for Twitter? Might twitter transform, in baby steps of course, into a monolithic entity like FB, too tethered and walled to be revolutionary, too heavy for its own hype, and clinging, like many “web” “sites” to the mere shadow of the VC balloon of yesteryear?

I’m on the side of the Depression-era Twitnet (barring twitter ever becoming some sort of gamechanger that takes us all by surprise, completely transforming the way we use the Internets – don’t count on it!). Given twitter’s ability to cross devices and networks (e.g., to cross over to devices and networks accessible by more people with lesser means), I’m more inclined to see it as a potential class leveler than a class divider. In a depressed economy (that was already depressed for most human beings), where efficiency and thrift constitute the logic that will prevail for most of us, 140 characters beats 160. And SMS beats email.

And blogs.

(throws that in a blender with the critique of television transforming printed news and editorial into dumbed down, ad-driven sound bytes).

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